Tag Archives: social media

Helpful Lessons I Still Use From My Social Media Degree

This post was originally published on BlogHer on March 19, 2015

I’ve been asked if it was worth getting my social media degree. On one hand, in four short years, most things I learned aren’t applicable today. The social media landscape changes too quickly. But there are overarching lessons that inform how I approach my blog or other social media accounts.

Here are 6 lessons I still use daily when it comes to social media.

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Social Media is Always Changing

It moves fast. It changes even faster. What was trending one day as the latest marketing tool, won’t be around the next day. Which means, there is always something new to discover and always something new to learn.

My degree may be four years old and I may have graduated, but I haven’t stopped learning the ins and outs of what’s new in the social media marketing world. Knowing that helps me keep perspective.

You Have the Freedom to Try New Things

No, my degree didn’t give me the freedom to try skydiving (wouldn’t that make for an incredible Instagram post…), but it did provide me with a new outlet to think outside the box. Traditional marketing is all about advertisements, commercials, and so on, all of which are expensive.

Social media allows users to see what works for their companies without spending a lot of marketing dollars. The possibilities with social media marketing are endless. What works for one brand, may not work another. And that’s okay. Trial and error is the name of the game in social media until you find something that works.

It keeps me creative in the workplace.

Connect With Like-Minded People

Believe it or not, there are people out there that don’t care to talk about Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and so on all day. They don’t care about the latest trends, and they don’t care about what new marketing scheme you came up with.

By connecting with others who love social media marketing the way you do, it provides you with a group of people who can be a sounding board for ideas. And that same group of people may also be the group who provides you with ideas you hadn’t even thought of.

Knowing how important it is to find your “tribe” workwise also translates into my daily blogging approach.

Knowledge Makes You an “Expert”

I put that loosely only because it seems like you could throw a rock and hit at least 15experts in social media marketing. Sometimes they are people who have learned much of what they know on their own, by reading, experimenting and the like. Other times, they learned about social media in the classroom.

Does one or the other make you any more of an expert? No. What makes you an expert is gathering the knowledge that will help you market your brand properly on social media.

Someday, that social media degree will be just as common as an English degree. So, yes, a social media degree is useful because it sets you apart as an expert in the field. That is, as long as you keep learning.

Everyone Needs to Work for Followers

As much as I had hoped graduating with a social media degree would mean that I would suddenly have thousands of people who would listen to me on Twitter, it didn’t happen, nor will it happen. But what I did discover were the proper tools and etiquette for building a following.

Thank those who do follow you and follow back. Share their work. Repost their pictures. It takes time and effort, but you will see you social media grow. And the hard work will pay off.

Social Media Is Sticking Around

If the growth of some the platforms out there like Instagram and Twitter are any indication about the direction social media is going, I think it’s safe to say that social media is a pretty solid focus for both undergraduate and graduate programs. It’s a growing field, and as the years go on, the need for social media experts will only increase.

My degree is so much more to me than learning the ins and outs of Facebook. If you love social media, and find yourself on it 24/7, and are interested in analytics, tools, and everything else that goes into marketing, this may be the degree for you.

My classes in social media were, by far, the hardest classes I took. But because I was interested in social media marketing, I loved them and excelled in them. And if you feel as strongly about social media marketing as I do, then you should definitely pursue it!

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Why I’m a Failure at Blogging

You’re probably looking at the title of this post wondering, “Why would she even write something like this for her blog?”

And you’re right. I’m asking myself that too. But, here’s the thing. In terms of being a “blogger”, I do fail at it. Here’s why.

Failure at Blogging

I go for long periods of time where I just don’t post.

A long period in the blogging world is a few days. I sometimes go for a week or two without posting anything. New content is key. Especially when you’re trying to build your audience. And if you don’t post, there isn’t new content for new and old readers to read. But it’s okay, because I didn’t start this blog to have hundreds of thousands of readers (even though it would be nice). I post when I feel the inspiration, or feel I have some worthy to say.

I forget to comment on other blogs.

Another key piece of blogging 101. To build a following, you must comment and connect with other bloggers. I try really really hard to do this. But sometimes, weeks go by when my time is limited, and I forget. It has nothing to do with the blog I’m reading or the content. I honestly just forget. Having said that, I might start setting reminders to check out my favorite blogs and comment on them.

Twitter and I have a love/hate relationship.

Yes. I love social media. I have a degree in it after all. But when it comes to using my own personal twitter, I find that sometimes I just don’t have the energy for it. I’ll go in spurts where I’ll find lots and lots of content to schedule via Hootsuite, including my blog posts, and try to connect with all the right people, and grow my following. And I’ll be really good about it for like 2 weeks. And then, something happens, and it all goes to hell. Literally. At the time of this post, I can’t tell you the last I actually scheduled something for Twitter (okay, it was probably in January). Or even really interacted with people on Twitter (again, that was probably last month). But whatever, you get the point.

My blog doesn’t have a niche.

My blog will never have a niche. Ever. I like to talk. I ramble a lot. This blog is essentially me thinking out loud. When I finally figured out a tagline I actually liked, see header above, I realized that it’s okay to not have a niche, because this blog is all about my musings. It’s who I am. I don’t fit into the healthy living category or the beauty category, or even the book review category. It’s a lifestyle blog. Purely because it’s the ramblings of my life.

It’s disorganized, random and sometimes unruly.

And no, I’m not talking about my life or my hair. Yes, my blog is all of those things. You many not be able to see it, but I certainly do on the back end. And boy is it a disaster. I’ve cleaned it up quite a bit since I redid the blog. But it’s still not organized. I just hope none of you notice, but you probably will now that I mentioned it.

But what I don’t fail at

Loving my blog to pieces. My blog is an extension of me. So it may fail in the traditional blogging sense, but to me, it’s a huge success and something I am oh so proud of.

Insta-Life {February}

Instagram. We all know how much I love it (you can read the posts here and here). So it only seems proper to give an update on my Insta-Life.

Starting with February, since I just thought of it this week, once a month, I’ll share some of my favorite images from my instagram account.

Insta-Life February

I always say life is better in photos.

Enjoy!

#SuperbowlChamps2015.

A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

Sick of the snow already, but it does make for some lovely pictures. #winter #snow A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

This is my year. Morning #motivation.

A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

Jesse the wonder horse enjoyIng some playtime before lessons. #hightailacres #horses #horsesofinstagram A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

My Valentine’s Day flowers are blooming and look so beautiful. #love #flowers A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

Doing a little local shopping. So in love with this little shop. #thenest #amesbury

A photo posted by Eryn Carter (@itseryne) on

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I Love These Instagram Accounts Right Now.

Ah. Instagram. The fastest growing social media network. I remember when it first came on the scene. I saw friends posting images from it to their Facebook accounts and I wondered what it was all about.

This was back when I still had a Droid and Instagram was an iPhone only app.

When I got my first iPhone in 2012, Instagram was the first app I downloaded. I couldn’t wait to get my hands on it. I couldn’t wait to start taking pictures and sharing with the world.

Instagram AccountsUnsplash // Jeff Sheldon

Fast forward three iPhones and 3 years later. I’m still just as obsessed with Instagram as I was on day one. I’ve already written a post on obsession with it. I won’t bore you with why I love it, you can check out that post to see why. Instead, I wanted to share with you some of my favorite Instagram accounts. And yes, there will be some overlap with my older post. Because some are still my top accounts.

By the Brush

I’m a very visual person, and I love my images to very visually appealing. I’ve love her account for the simplicity of it, but her images are always beautiful.

close to the river’s edge…away from everything else.

A photo posted by laura e. pritchett (@bythebrush) on

       

Tiny PMS Match

I stumbled across this account when she was featured in an article on BuzzFeed and completely fell in love. Seriously. It’s incredible.

Its Erin James

Her engagement ring was featured on the knot one day right after she was engaged, which led to me to her account. She’s a lifestyle and fashion blogger, and is in the process of planning her wedding (kindred spirits perhaps?). But her account is filled with beautiful feminine images. It’s very whimsical at times.

2Sisters_Angie

No words. I just adore this account. I mean how can you not? It’s just amazing.

There wasn’t actually a question as to which her favorite would be 😉 #fashionbymayhem

A photo posted by Angie (@2sisters_angie) on

Ballet Zaida

I’ve always had a love for ballerinas. I never was a dancer (didn’t have the body for it…or the coordination,) but I absolutely love watching and seeing pictures. They are incredible athletes and this account captures this.

Dancer – @isabellalwalsh Location – San Francisco, California. #BalletZaida #IsabellaWalsh #Dance A photo posted by Ballet Zaida (@balletzaida) on

Of course, these are only a select few that I love. It’s hard to narrow down when you have hundreds that you love to look at, but those are my current favorites.

Enjoy!

Don’t forget to follow me: @itseryne (personal fun images) and @erynephotography (my professional account – images from sessions and such!)

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Featured Member Post on BlogHer

I’m so insanely excited to announce that my post, #TransformationTuesday, was chosen as a Featured Member Post for today on BlogHer!

Featured member Post 9_16_14

That alone put my excitement over the top, but I was even more excited to discover that they have featured it on their homepage.

Front Page of Blog Her 9_16_14

And to make things even better…… they tweeted the post out to their over 100K followers on Twitter.

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I know my excitement may seem extreme, but this is the first time that any of my blog posts have been picked up or featured on any huge site like this. I don’t really have words to describe how I feel. Besides excitement. Since I’ve probably written than word at least 5 times already.

I always write for me. And because I enjoy it. So for it to have the potential to be seen by hundreds of thousands of people is pretty surreal. And a dream. And I guess, a bucket list item accomplished too (I wanted a post to go viral. While not viral, I’ll consider it a success!)

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Growing Up Alex: Final Words

I can’t believe this is the final post in the “Growing Up Alex” series. I’m not going to say much, as I want this final post to be all about her, but I just want to thank everyone who has read, commented, liked, shared and been a part of this series. I am honored that this blog was able to be the venue for Alex to tell her story and oh-so-proud of her doing so. She’s an amazing, remarkable, beautiful, incredible, strong and inspiring person and I am lucky to be able to call her my friend.

So thank you Alex for telling your story and continuing to inspire us all. We are so proud of you. XO

On to the final post.

My Advice

THROW AWAY THE SCALE.

That is essential. Have your nutritionist or doctor weigh you blindly if you relapse. The number on the scale does you no good if you are trying to recover from an eating disorder. As an alternative, listen to how your body feels (do you have energy or are you lethargic? Are  you dizzy or do you feel clearheaded? Are you motivated or do you just want to hide away?).

A huge thing for me is just  allowing my clothes to let me know how I am doing. Yes, they may feel tighter if you have just taken them out of the wash…but they will stretch back to normal as the day progresses. I knew I was relapsing last year when my clothes that once fit were hanging off of me. This was a sign for me to take action. In the 2 times that I have made it in to recovery, my clothing never got to tight.

Your body, shockingly, will not magically gain weight just because you are not stepping on a scale every day. Do not let the numbers control you. Cut counting calories as best you can. This is very difficult to do but it does get easier over time and with practice. Base your daily intake on exchanges/food groups, not calories. Do not label ANY foods as ‘good’ or ‘bad’. Food is fuel, and your body doesn’t know the difference [it just may know that some foods contain more nutrients when compared to others] between a muffin or multigrain toast. It just knows ‘energy’. Just keep things in moderation and be sure to have all of the food groups.

Eat breakfast! Yum!!! Do not read fitness magazines as they will tell you that you need to be consuming less than you actually do and, chances are, they will make you feel like you are lazy if you are not working out 2 hours a day, doing all of the latest exercise fads. The best alternative to these magazines is to find a nutritionist you feel comfortable with. They will reality check your distorted beliefs, they will help you structure a healthy meal plan and workout regimen, and if you need to be weighed, they are the best person to do it. Surround yourself with empathic, supportive people.

Repeat after me: Do the best you can with what you have. Progress, not perfection. You can start over at any time. Know in your mind what signs of relapse are for you and tell someone you trust [family member, friend, therapist, doctor, nutritionist, coworker) if you notice any of these signs. Do not be afraid to ask for help. You are not a failure if you relapse and you DO deserve help in regaining your recovery. If you feel faint, dizzy, hungry, etc…eat a snack. It isn’t weak of you to need food, perhaps you exerted more energy than you realized during the day. Some days we eat more than we do on other days and that is okay. Our bodies are very good at balancing out.

I had a lot of support over the years in my recovery and I want to thank these people who have supported me endlessly and have helped to me to recover.

First, my therapist and Dietician in NY who convinced me to finally pursue treatment: Hilary Brodski and Judi Zwang.

My amazing therapist from Montecatini who taught me how to challenge my distorted beliefs and not to worry about other people’s ‘stuff’, Nancy Staycer.

The best therapist I have ever had, who was there for me at the beginning of my recovery: Seanna.

One of the most amazing RD’s I have ever worked with and whom I would recommend to anyone, Shelley Woolsey.

My case manager at CEDC, even though she probably got sick of me after the 3rd time, Whitney Moore.

Some of the kick ass RC’s from California and CEDC. The amazingly strong women I met along the way, whom I will not name, so as to protect your privacy, but you know who you are…my first ever roommate whom loves cats just as much as I, the ‘condo clique’ and ‘Mitzi’, my bestfriend/soul sista, the kickass woman who knows how awesome our ‘mutual friend’ is, she who hails from No’Ho, the girls who shared an odd love of Matty in the Morning with me, the girls who participated in.

And I couldn’t ask for more supportive friends or family: My maid of honor Erin who was beyond supportive throughout this whole experience. Yili, who had only known me for a few months when I learned I was going to treatment and basically took me under her friendship wing full force. All of my amazing and wonderful friends who wrote and visited and haven’t run away (yet, ha!).

The supportive head of my graduate program, Dr Shtayermann.

Mom, Dad, Wendy and Randy for being my mom’s backbone, G&G, my aunts and uncle, the cousins [I left out an important part of my life because it is not my story to tell, but my youngest cousin passed away in 2007 and I think of him daily. I brought his picture to my room in residential], the recovery warriors of the blogosphere (haha!) and my wonderful fiance Steve and his dear son.

Oh, and my cats. They were, and are, the best therapy.

And Demi Lovato, whose music I embarrassingly loved before she came out and told her story. She was in treatment at the same time I was and while many think it may be PR for her, I think it  is wonderful that she is giving a voice to the evils and dangers of this disorder and that she is acting as a healthy and positive role model for young women. It doesn’t hurt that I still embarrassingly love her music.

Stay Strong 😉Photo on 2014-01-09 at 01.34 #2

 

Growing Up Alex: Being in Recovery

I don’t know how I did it, finding my way in to recovery, but suddenly something just clicked. I can’t pinpoint what it was or how I did it. I just realized how GOOD and capable I felt when I ate normally. It felt so good to be able to go out for a meal with my friends. I no longer isolated myself from them. I wasn’t scared of food anymore. I had energy! I didn’t sleep all day or stay up all night. I didn’t label foods as ‘safe’ or ‘unsafe’. I was able to work without much stress or exhaustion. It was the weirdest thing. It was as if I’d had some epiphany and it felt amazing and magical and I just wanted to share it with the whole world. I did have a bit of a relapse in 2013 due to some personal situations that occurred but I’ve already shared so much that I’m mainly not sharing these situations out of respect for saving space, ha!

Photo 148Do not give up hope! The end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 have put me back in a place of recovery. Do I still count calories? Yes, but not nearly as much as I used to, and I try my very best not to do so. Do I still feel guilty after eating? Sometimes. It depends on what it is and how my mood is that day. Do I still exercise? Yes, but very moderately and never on a machine that tells me numbers. Do I still step on a scale? NEVER. It is useless. I listen to how my body feels and how my clothes fit. If you are struggling with recovery, please throw out your scale. If you HAVE to get weighed, do a blind weight with your doctor. Do I still use skills I learned from treatment (kind of like when students ask, will I actually use this math in the real world?) you wonder? Yes! I’m working very hard on using only positive coping skills. When I am upset, I still lose my appetite. When I am angry or hurt I don’t feel like I deserve food. However, I talk myself through the situation and find other ways to deal with whatever it is I am feeling. And I make myself eat a well balanced meal, no matter what. If I am really, really struggling with my appetite I drink supplements.

Why is Recovery Worth it for me?

I feel like I am finally living my adult life. For the first time since I graduated college in 2008 I have an ‘adult’ job. This is a job that is actually related to my degree. Yes! A job in which I utilize the things I learned in my 4 years at Adelphi University! I am employed at a company–that I shall not name for anonymity purposes–in which I work with mostly late adolescents as they transition in to adulthood. They have an array of diagnoses: Downs Syndrome, Developmental Disorders, ADHD, Aspergers, Traumatic Brain Injury… I also, on occasion work with adults with similar diagnoses as they navigate and prosper in their daily lives. I LOVE MY JOB AND THE PEOPLE I WORK WITH.1902079_10203393859676905_104767707_n

As for falling in love…well, it just happens, I suppose. I never thought I’d trust again or find love after what happened with my ex. I have met someone wonderful, however. It’s lovely when it happens and it makes continuing on in recovery much more important to me. Yes, I am doing it for myself, but it doesn’t hurt to want to be the best person you can be for someone you love. I have found an incredibly supportive partner in my fiancé, Steve. He lets me cry when I am overwhelmed by food and doesn’t judge me or tell me I am being dramatic, he hugs me until I calm down, he tells me when my thinking is skewed but uses empathy in doing so, and he even removes the nutrition information from food so that I won’t accidentally count calories and begin to feel guilt if I eat something!

 Growing Up Alex: Final Words will be posted on Thursday 4/10/2014. Make sure to follow the blog to receive an e-mail for when it’s posted or follow it on Bloglovin‘!

Growing Up Alex: Residential Treatment

I was petrified. I didn’t think I was thin enough to go to treatment. I thought I’d be the biggest girl there and that everyone would think I was too fat to be there. I told my treatment team that I’d only go to treatment if I could finish my semester at grad school AND go to California for it. I didn’t think they’d agree. Joke was on me: they did.

On June 9, 2010 I got on a plane by myself and flew out to California to a residential treatment center. I quickly learned that residential treatment had women of all sizes and diagnoses. And while, yes, some women were thinner than I was, there were also women of all different sizes. I started to realize that size didn’t matter AT ALL when a person has an eating disorder. We all had the same unhealthy relationship with food and we all were putting our bodies in terrible danger. We just dealt with our relationship with food differently: some of us restricted our intake, some ate only ‘clean’ or ‘healthy’ foods, some exercised obsessively, some binged and purged, some only binged, some did a mix of Photo 144many different behaviors.

When I sat down at the dinner table that first night in California—to clarify, this was my first time sitting at a dinner table for an actual meal in over a decade– I was expected to eat 50% of my meal. The next day I would be expected to eat 75% of my meal. The third day onward I had to eat 100%. Depending on how much of my meal I did not eat, I would be expected to drink 1-2 Ensure Plus supplements.

When you begin the refeeding process they start you off at a very low intake. The body can react in very odd ways to refeeding, so they gradually build you up. For instance, during refeeding my phosphate levels dropped below a healthy level. Other women I was with developed edema. On that First night, I ate just enough so that I wouldn’t have to drink a supplement. My stomach was in so much pain from eating real food that I just curled up in a ball and cried on the couch. The nurse kept telling me to sit up straight, she said it would help with digestion. Sitting up straight was not comforting to me. Staff eventually began to redirect my behaviors of curling up by prompting me with the word, ‘Pretzel’ (meaning that I was curling up in to a position that resembled a pretzel, something that is a bit like curling up in fetal position).

The other women in treatment were so nice and supportive. They tried to help me distract my mind from how physically uncomfortable I felt by inviting me to do different crafts with them: making bracelets, making collages, and just talking to me and asking me questions about myself and the east coast.

The Inside Scoop on Residential Treatment

I had read books and heard the horror stories about treatment, but I honestly didn’t know what to actually expect. In treatment, they lock up all of your shower items and other things that they refer to as ‘sharps’ like mouth wash containing alcohol, nail clippers, hair clips, floss, nail polish, etc. The purpose behind this was to prevent women from self-harming. They kept our bathrooms locked except during shower time, which occurred one hour before bed or one hour before breakfast. We could only look in the mirror in the time we were allowed in our bathrooms when we had to shower and get ready for the day or for bed. If we had to use the bathroom  during the day we had to ask for permission and go about our business with the door left ajar. A counselor had to both check and flush the toilet for us. It was very embarrassing, but quite a reality check.

As we proved ourselves to our treatment team [a therapist, dietician, and psychiatrist] we’d be allowed to go in to the bathroom on our own unless it was after meal time. If it was after meal time, we could still have the door shut, but we’d have to count or sing. This is not as easy as it may sound!

They based our meal plans on exchanges, rather than calories. So we’d have x amount of grains, x amount of fat, x amount of protein, x amount of vegetable or fruit. Every other week we went on a meal challenge, essentially a trip to a restaurant. On the opposite week, our challenge would be to eat a dessert. We had to choose our meals which was incredibly scary because it was doing something that you had told yourself for so long was not okay, because it meant you were choosing food and accepting that you would eat it. We also had to be sure to mix it up so as not to develop any new safe foods or meal rituals. I was continuously redirected during meals if I tried to break a sandwich apart. I NEVER bit in to anything and I was forced to change this habit. Other food rituals people have can be chewing very slowly, taking very small bites, eating one food group at a time…to be honest, some of the things treatment centers deem as food rituals could be something very normal to any given person, eating disordered or not, so it could get confusing. Sometimes we literally had no idea we were doing something disordered.

I met my best friend through treatment.
I met my best friend through treatment.

Light exercise would slowly be incorporated in to our treatment plan when our vitals (blood pressure, heart rate, weight gain), a decrease in ritualistic behaviors, and our nutritionist deemed us ready. I was finally granted exercise my last week in residential. They went for leisurely walks on the beach for exercise or did yoga. Did I mention I was in California? Gaining the privilege of going for a walk on a beach in CA was extremely exciting for me and I was rather disappointed that I only got to do it twice.

They took our cell phones and we were only allowed 40 minutes of phone calls a week from a house phone. We were also only allowed to use our laptops to check our email for 30 minutes on Saturdays. This was hard for a lot of us for different reasons, some women had young children waiting for them at home. For me, I was across the country,  so I couldn’t see my family during family weekend or during visiting hours. It was difficult to only be able to communicate with my family by phone for a limited amount of time. We couldn’t read magazines or watch tv. We could only watch movies that had been pre-approved as non-triggering by staff. You get to a point in treatment where you begin to wonder if there is anything that ISN’T going to trigger at least one individual. We got to go on outings on Wednesdays and Saturdays, which we chose as a group. One outing was typically to Target, where we were able to purchase things like nail polish or shampoo or notebooks or other things we might need or use as activities. The other was a fun trip like going to the beach or a bookstore or to a nail salon.

Before each meal we had to rate our hunger on a scale from 1-10 and say an affirmation. After each meal we had to rate our fullness. A typical day was: breakfast, group, snack, exercise for those allowed, lunch, group, quiet time, dinner, group, free time, snack, bed. We had groups such as DBT [my favorite, it presented me with the ability to reframe my thoughts and an array of healthy coping skills that I still use it to this day], CBT [My least favorite], an open therapy group, Art therapy, Nutrition, Spirituality, Mindfulness, etc. We were weighed every morning in a Johnny, and we had to do a check to prove we weren’t wearing anything under the Johnny. We were never allowed to know our weight.

I met some of the most amazing women there and I will always remember them and cherish our laughter and our tears and the amazing support we were able to give one another. I had never been around such supportive people who also understood just how I was feeling. I also will credit my therapist Nancy, to this day, for giving me such a reality check and helping me explore so many aspects of the disorder.

Going Home and Relapse (Trigger Warning)

When I went home [insurance had kicked me out before I even reached my goal weight, My eating disorder was, unfortunately, very pleased by this] I relapsed VERY quickly. I wound up going to 2 different treatment [resulting in a total of 6 residential stays, which just shows you how difficult it can be to recover] centers over the next 2 years. This time, I stayed on the East Coast. The second center I went to after my initial stay in California was just outside of Boston. I stayed there twice and, while I met my best friend in my time at this particular treatment center, I believe this to be the worst treatment center I was in. They made me feel like I WAS my eating disorder, like I was bad. I was sent home for 24 hours in my first week there because I was struggling to finish my meals in the allotted 30 minutes. I had to write a letter stating why I believed I deserved to stay in front of my case manager, the therapist, my father, and the program director. They let me stay, but they later kicked me out of their day program for losing 1 pound. For some reason they took me back a month later with a very strict contract. I had to eat 100% of my meals all within the allotted time and if one bite was left when the timer went off I was out. I wasn’t even allowed the option to drink an entire ensure if I left one bite of my meal due to not being able to finish it all in 30 minutes. The other women in the program were allowed to have a supplement [and often refused] if they did not finish in time. I felt this was very unfair and I think it made me go in to a sort of fake recovery, for example: I wanted recovery so badly that I basically forced food down my throat. I even choked once in attempt to beat the clock. I was later kicked out of the day program, again, for losing weight. I believe this treatment center cared more about success stories than they did with helping people who were truly struggling, however, I know others walked out of there with more positive memories, so maybe I just felt bullied by the staff. Who knows. I did, however, meet many supportive women whom I still call friends in my time there.

My final treatment program was located in Cambridge, MA. This was the least structured program I had attended and, by far, had the worst food and was the least aesthetically appealing. Montecatini [the treatment center in California] and the first Boston treatment center were both in beautiful houses. This treatment center looked like a dorm. It also had more patients than either of the other programs. It could get very overwhelming, with so many people and I knew so much about DBT, CBT, and nutrition at this point that I honestly think I just went there to finish up my personal therapy and gain structured eating.

While in the day program in Cambridge, I learned that my [now ex] boyfriend had begun using heroin, had been caught buying a large amount of it, would be going to court ordered rehab for a year, and that he had been cheating on me with his ex girlfriend on and off for quite some time. I dealt with the breakup and moved back to MA from NY officially. We had been together for 6 years and I foolishly thought I was going to marry him. I was beyond angry, very depressed, embarrassed, ashamed, and my trust was completely shot. Some people deal with these situations by overeating, I just lose my appetite. I was sent back up to residential treatment from the day program and was put in a structured setting where I was forced to eat. I am very grateful to have had this support at this point in my life. However, since my control over food was gone, I began taking my frustration and anger out in other ways. I’d scratch my skin raw because I was used to restricting my food so as to avoid my emotions or to have control over something. I tended to feel like I had to hurt myself in some way if something went wrong in my life, and usually it was through restriction and purging. I still have scars on my left arm, which is shameful. Admitting this publically is actually very scary. Only a few people know where those scars actually came from. When people would ask, I’d say I had accidentally burned myself with my straightening iron. The irony in this is that just a few months ago, I actually DID accidentally grab my skin while straightening my hair and burned the very arm I used to scratch. I guess my flat iron got sick of taking the blame and decided to play a little double jeopardy 😉

For some reason, after bouncing back and forth between the day program and the residential program [at the second Boston treatment center, if your weight drops in the day program they try to support you and help you. If it keeps dropping, they try to get you admitted back to residential treatment to get you back on track. This is why I respect program #2  over program #1. Program #1 has since closed] I was finally discharged from my 6th and final stay in residential treatment at the end of January 2012 after beginning my journey in to recovery in June of 2010. I refused to go to Partial [day program]. I didn’t think it was helpful at all. I wanted to do it on my own. And I did.

 Growing Up Alex: Being In Recovery will be posted on Monday 4/7/2014. Make sure to follow the blog to receive an e-mail for when it’s posted or follow it on Bloglovin‘!

Growing Up Alex: College and the After-Years

Trigger Warning: The Increase in Behaviors in College and Potential Environmental Causes

In college, I was finally able to recognize that I was anorexic. I still wouldn’t say the word out loud, but I would go all day without eating, would drink one chai latte, and would consider myself a selfish pig for doing so. The majority of foods were not ‘safe’. I didn’t eat desserts or snacks for years.

I went through phases: the fruit salad phase, the rice cake phase, the salad no dressing phase, the pretzel phase, the apple phase. When I say these were phases, I mean that I literally would only eat the ‘phase’ food in a day. And only at night.

Keeping up my electrolytes
Keeping up my electrolytes

I had very strict rules about the caloric intake, protein, and fat grams that I consumed. The fewer, the better. The more consumed, the longer I would have to spend on the treadmill. The treadmill wasn’t just to burn off what little I had eaten. I had to make sure I had worked out for an amount of time that ended in a zero or a 5. I had to burn off calories that ended in a zero or a 5. And I had to have gone a distance that ended in a zero. So, even if I matched my calories consumed, I would keep going until all 3 numbers aligned to meet my ‘rules’.

I refused to eat in front of anyone. I locked myself in my room to eat my rice cakes, apple slices, or salad. If anyone interrupted me [this included my ex-boyfriend], I’d throw my food out the window and start crying because they had interrupted my only time I was allowed to eat and now I “would have to wait until the next day” to eat again. I was working and going to school and any time that I was not engaged in one of these activities I would sleep until 2pm. Then I would shower. Then I would work out. Then I would eat what I was ‘allowed’ to eat midday [usually apple slices and a cup of 25 calorie per packet hot chocolate. Then I would shower again. Later I would go for a walk. Then I would lock myself in my room for my ‘allowed’ dinner. Eventually, I’d stay up late with my ex-boyfriend because when one is not taking in proper nutrition,  it can be very difficult to fall asleep. If my ex went out, I would stay locked in my room doing homework or perusing the internet until 4 or 5 in the morning only to repeat the process upon awakening.

In my early 20’s I realized that when I felt too full, or I ate one rice cake too many, purging was the best solution. I would feel high immediately after the purge and then terribly weak and dizzy. The purging eventually led to me being sent to the ER. I thought it was normal to be irritable ALL of the time. I thought it was normal to be completely overwhelmed by simple tasks. I thought it was normal for my hands to shake and for my heart to flutter. Oddly, I truly thought it was normal to stand up and have the room go black.

When I was 23 or 24, I began to acknowledge how miserable I was. I had graduated with a degree in Psychology from my college in NY. I had gotten in to graduate school for a Master’s in Mental Health Counseling. I was working as a nanny. And I was exhausted and isolated. I rarely went out with my friends because I feared eating around them or I was just plain too tired. I spent most of my time working, going to school, reading, writing papers, and sleeping. When I would nanny I would be so tired that I didn’t have the energy to play with the little boy I was watching. I’d be elated when there were rainy days and we’d have to stay inside and watch a movie or read a book. The biggest wake up call for me was when I realized that I felt I had to eat less than this sweet and innocent little 4 year-old boy did.Photo on 2013-02-04 at 21.32 #3

I made the decision to see a therapist and nutritionist because I didn’t want to feel so horrible but I didn’t know how to stop what I was doing. They were very supportive but they would continuously tell me how strong my eating disorder was. I didn’t believe them because I didn’t look like the women portrayed in the media…or because the number on the scale wasn’t below a number I deemed ‘anorexic’.

My nutritionist banned me from exercising and I listened enough to stop going to the gym,  but I would still walk to that nutritionist appointment , which was 4 miles away. One day, after I was ordered to get blood drawn, I decided that riding my bike was a fine way to get to my appointment. 8 vials of blood and large bruising from where the needle had been did not sway me from riding my bike home. Sometimes I’d walk to Target or Barnes and Noble, 10 miles round trip. I won’t say what I was eating at this point because it is not necessary, nor is it helpful to anyone trying to recover.

At 24, I found myself sitting in a room with my mother, my father, my therapist, and my nutritionist [and notes from my doctor]. They had all decided that I had to go to residential treatment. I had been threatened with this before but I was over 18, so legally they could not make me. I always had an excuse: ‘I need to finish sophomore year of college,’ or ‘I just need to graduate college’. My therapist and nutritionist essentially gave me the ultimatum: go to treatment or we can no longer help you.

Growing Up Alex: Residential Treatment will be posted on Thursday 4/3/2014. Make sure to follow the blog to receive an e-mail for when it’s posted or follow it on Bloglovin‘!

 

Photo credit to Jeyn Laundrie
Photo credit to Jeyn Laundrie